• Testimonials

    Adam Wells was a patient of the RPAH Interstitial Lung Diseases Clinic between 2014 and 2017. From the outset, he had fairly severe lung disease (an advanced form of pulmonary sarcoidosis), causing him to have chronic productive cough and breathlessness. Despite this, Adam continued with his very demanding full-time job throughout most of that period.

    As his disease progressed, Adam needed multiple admissions to hospital with infections. Each episode left him with worsening lung function, eventually requiring oxygen and positive pressure breathing support during sleep. He required high doses of immunosuppression and antibiotics, and even on one occasion, full life support in the intensive care unit. Even with such severe disease, Adam remained exceptionally physically active, exercising with the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Team multiple times a week.

    When he eventually came to lung transplantation towards the end of 2017, he had very little remaining healthy lung, but was hugely determined and had held onto a reasonable degree of fitness. As a result, Adam’s post-operative recovery has been remarkable. Adam is thriving with his new lungs and can now exercise without limitation.

    Dr Lauren Troy
    PhD FRACP MBBS BMedSci
    Respiratory Specialist
    Royal Prince Alfred Hospital
    Clinical Senior Lecturer
    University of Sydney


    I first met Adam in my private rooms in February 2015 when he was referred for consideration of a lung transplant because of his underlying advanced lung condition Sarcoidosis. I clearly remember that even then he had such a positive attitude and was aiming to do all that he could to stay fit and healthy.

    I saw him one more time after this and heard from time to time that he wasn’t doing so well requiring recurrent admissions to hospital at RPAH. After he required life support in October 2016, required 24 hours of oxygen, and non invasive ventilation to help him breathe, and developed pulmonary hypertension he was referred to the lung transplant clinic in August 2017 for an expedited work up for lung transplant.

    He had one dry run -where the organ donation did not go ahead -however soon after this he underwent a bilateral lung transplant on the 18/10/2017. He has done so well after this particularly since he had always done cardiopulmonary rehabilitation so he was ahead of the game in terms of fitness.

    Adam is absolutely thrilled with the excellent outcome from his transplant which has revolutionised his health and well being. He is now jumping out of his skin to show his respect and sincere gratitude in regards to his donor and their family for offering Adam another chance at life.

    Adam is extremely passionate about wanting to make a big improvement in organ donation rates in Australia and will succeed in doing this because of his great resolve and tenacity.

    Dr Monique Malouf
    MB BS FRACP
    Senior Staff Specialist in Lung Transplantation
    Consultant Thoracic Physician
    Senior Conjoint Lecturer, UNSW
    St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney


    8 May 2018

    When Adam Wells first came into my rooms there were two things I noted. Firstly how sick he was, and secondly how motivated he was. Adam was well informed and driven to do well from a transplant. It felt like Adam interviewed me. He had numerous questions, he knew all about the procedure and he was keen to get something done and keen to get better.

    In many ways Adam was the perfect patient and he is the reason that I love transplantation. Because, in contrast to his motivation and enthusiasm, he was incredibly sick. He was oxygen dependant, he could barely perform functions, barely perform daily normal activities and he was really on a downward spiral in terms of his quality of life and in fact his life expectancy. It was clear that Adam needed a transplant soon and it was a joy to list him and get him ready for the procedure.

    Typically the night of the procedure is a whirl-wind, and no doubt Adam was swept up in the myriad of doctors, anaesthetists and nurses that you meet on the night of the transplant. His procedure, although difficult, went smoothly and his lungs were indeed at the end of their natural life. They were heavily scarred and shrunken as a result of his underlying condition. Instead of the light fluffy bags that lungs normally are, these were heavy scarred organs. There was a reasonable amount of dissection to get them out, and the implantation of the news ones went uneventfully. It was here that all my expectations of Adam and his nature were vindicated. Adam took over his recovery with the enthusiasm and motivation that we as transplant doctors love to see. He made an excellent recovery and continues to recover in this way.

    The next time I met Adam as at a Fund Raiser where we happened to park our Utes next to one another, and after a period of comparing Utes we went onto raise a bit more money for research into transplantation. Adam is not keen to sit still and he is embarking on a mammoth undertaking to do the Kokoda Trail, which will be fantastic and a testament to how great lung transplantation is and how it can return people to a fantastic quality of life. I am sure , like everything in life, he will take this in his stride.

    Dr Paul Jansz
    BMed. FRACS, PhD
    Cardiothoracic Surgeon & Transplant Surgeon
    Director Heart & Lung Transplant Program
    Director of Cardiothoracic
    St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney


    Adam and pulmonary rehab are the perfect match!! Effective and Motivating!!

    Adam came to us following a hospital admission and worked hard not only to improve his exercise capacity and quality of life but he motivated others to do their best. He returned again to prepare for transplant and now about 10 weeks post-transplant he is doing elite training at pulmonary rehab in preparation for the tough 96km Kokoda Trail. We are all proud of you Adam and know you can do this for yourself and to raise awareness of the need for more organ donors.

    Dr Lissa Spencer
    PhD, BAppSc
    Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist
    Chronic Disease Rehabilitation
    Royal Prince Alfred Hospital

  • Sponsors

    St Vincent's Hospital
    Royal Prince Alfred Hospital
    Donate Life
    St Vincent's Curran Foundation
    Spark Interact
    Woolcock
    Jodie McGregor Flowers

Testimonials

Adam Wells was a patient of the RPAH Interstitial Lung Diseases Clinic between 2014 and 2017. From the outset, he had fairly severe lung disease (an advanced form of pulmonary sarcoidosis), causing him to have chronic productive cough and breathlessness. Despite this, Adam continued with his very demanding full-time job throughout most of that period.

As his disease progressed, Adam needed multiple admissions to hospital with infections. Each episode left him with worsening lung function, eventually requiring oxygen and positive pressure breathing support during sleep. He required high doses of immunosuppression and antibiotics, and even on one occasion, full life support in the intensive care unit. Even with such severe disease, Adam remained exceptionally physically active, exercising with the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Team multiple times a week.

When he eventually came to lung transplantation towards the end of 2017, he had very little remaining healthy lung, but was hugely determined and had held onto a reasonable degree of fitness. As a result, Adam’s post-operative recovery has been remarkable. Adam is thriving with his new lungs and can now exercise without limitation.

Dr Lauren Troy
PhD FRACP MBBS BMedSci
Respiratory Specialist
Royal Prince Alfred Hospital
Clinical Senior Lecturer
University of Sydney


I first met Adam in my private rooms in February 2015 when he was referred for consideration of a lung transplant because of his underlying advanced lung condition Sarcoidosis. I clearly remember that even then he had such a positive attitude and was aiming to do all that he could to stay fit and healthy.

I saw him one more time after this and heard from time to time that he wasn’t doing so well requiring recurrent admissions to hospital at RPAH. After he required life support in October 2016, required 24 hours of oxygen, and non invasive ventilation to help him breathe, and developed pulmonary hypertension he was referred to the lung transplant clinic in August 2017 for an expedited work up for lung transplant.

He had one dry run -where the organ donation did not go ahead -however soon after this he underwent a bilateral lung transplant on the 18/10/2017. He has done so well after this particularly since he had always done cardiopulmonary rehabilitation so he was ahead of the game in terms of fitness.

Adam is absolutely thrilled with the excellent outcome from his transplant which has revolutionised his health and well being. He is now jumping out of his skin to show his respect and sincere gratitude in regards to his donor and their family for offering Adam another chance at life.

Adam is extremely passionate about wanting to make a big improvement in organ donation rates in Australia and will succeed in doing this because of his great resolve and tenacity.

Dr Monique Malouf
MB BS FRACP
Senior Staff Specialist in Lung Transplantation
Consultant Thoracic Physician
Senior Conjoint Lecturer, UNSW
St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney


8 May 2018

When Adam Wells first came into my rooms there were two things I noted. Firstly how sick he was, and secondly how motivated he was. Adam was well informed and driven to do well from a transplant. It felt like Adam interviewed me. He had numerous questions, he knew all about the procedure and he was keen to get something done and keen to get better.

In many ways Adam was the perfect patient and he is the reason that I love transplantation. Because, in contrast to his motivation and enthusiasm, he was incredibly sick. He was oxygen dependant, he could barely perform functions, barely perform daily normal activities and he was really on a downward spiral in terms of his quality of life and in fact his life expectancy. It was clear that Adam needed a transplant soon and it was a joy to list him and get him ready for the procedure.

Typically the night of the procedure is a whirl-wind, and no doubt Adam was swept up in the myriad of doctors, anaesthetists and nurses that you meet on the night of the transplant. His procedure, although difficult, went smoothly and his lungs were indeed at the end of their natural life. They were heavily scarred and shrunken as a result of his underlying condition. Instead of the light fluffy bags that lungs normally are, these were heavy scarred organs. There was a reasonable amount of dissection to get them out, and the implantation of the news ones went uneventfully. It was here that all my expectations of Adam and his nature were vindicated. Adam took over his recovery with the enthusiasm and motivation that we as transplant doctors love to see. He made an excellent recovery and continues to recover in this way.

The next time I met Adam as at a Fund Raiser where we happened to park our Utes next to one another, and after a period of comparing Utes we went onto raise a bit more money for research into transplantation. Adam is not keen to sit still and he is embarking on a mammoth undertaking to do the Kokoda Trail, which will be fantastic and a testament to how great lung transplantation is and how it can return people to a fantastic quality of life. I am sure , like everything in life, he will take this in his stride.

Dr Paul Jansz
BMed. FRACS, PhD
Cardiothoracic Surgeon & Transplant Surgeon
Director Heart & Lung Transplant Program
Director of Cardiothoracic
St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney


Adam and pulmonary rehab are the perfect match!! Effective and Motivating!!

Adam came to us following a hospital admission and worked hard not only to improve his exercise capacity and quality of life but he motivated others to do their best. He returned again to prepare for transplant and now about 10 weeks post-transplant he is doing elite training at pulmonary rehab in preparation for the tough 96km Kokoda Trail. We are all proud of you Adam and know you can do this for yourself and to raise awareness of the need for more organ donors.

Dr Lissa Spencer
PhD, BAppSc
Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist
Chronic Disease Rehabilitation
Royal Prince Alfred Hospital

Sponsors

St Vincent's Hospital
Royal Prince Alfred Hospital
Donate Life
St Vincent's Curran Foundation
Spark Interact
Woolcock
Jodie McGregor Flowers